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Dream Shift (DS or d-shift) occurs when an individual is partially or entirely an animal within a dream while the physical body remains unchanged. The dream might also include the transformation into the animal. A dream shift can occur in both lucid and non-lucid states.[1] [2]

See also: Shift (Therianthropic)

This usually covers a variety of experiences, although generally speaking if a person accepts oneself as an animal while dreaming, it can be qualified as a dream-shift. This, in turn, can sometimes lead to emotional stress strong enough to interrupt a dream (person wakes up unexpectedly).

This is a common type of shift that is often discussed in the community. Seeing or sensing oneself as an animal during a dream was taking place in the earliest days of the community as Alt.horror.werewolves was transitioning from a group about werewolf fiction to a group for people who intrinsically identified as nonhuman creatures. [3]

For Consideration

People who do not identify as Therianthropes can also have dream shifts.

Never automatically assume that seeing yourself as an animal in a dream means that you are a Therian or that the animal is your theriotype. Many other experiences, research, and introspection should also be taken into consideration when deciding whether or not you identify as Therian. Seeing oneself as an animal other than the known theriotype, may only be a dream cameo shift and does not always indicate that one is a polytherian. Not every dream may be relevant to one's therianthropy. Sometimes animals appear symbolically to represent events or mental/emotional states that the dreamer is experiencing in life.

References

  1. Shifters.org Encyclopedia (2006 web archive) - http://web.archive.org/web/20060901112859/http://www.therianthropy.org/SO/encyclopedia.htm
  2. Scribner, O. “Otherkin lexicon: A multi-lingual dictionary of jargon used in the communities of otherkin, therianthropes, and other similar peoples, v. 0.1 Abridged.” The Art and Writing of O. Scribner. 8 September, 2012. http://frameacloud.com/otherkin/nonfiction-otherkin/otherkin-lexicon/
  3. "Stop howling, we heard you already" November 7, 1993, https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/alt.horror.werewolves/cnaZs0KC9Bk